Construction of Persian and Oriental area rugs




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      Meshkinshahr Rugs
      Weavers of these regions usually use their own symmetrical Turkish double knotting style, which tends to be dense and tightly packed down. The asymmetrical Persian knot can also be seen in cities such as Ardabil. The pile of these rugs is thick lustrous wool, handspun from local sheep. Cotton is the material of choice for the foundation because it is very strong. However, goat hair can also be seen in some Turkish tribal carpets. In a few regions such as Ardabil, silk is blended in with the wool pile to produce a gorgeous rug. Natural vegetable and root dyes are mainly used for the coloring of the rugs. These rugs are generally very sturdy and hardwearing and they still use the brilliant weaving techniques that they used thousands of years ago.

      Sabzevar Rugs
      There are many grades of handmade rugs produced in this vast Persian province of Khorassan, ranging from medium to fine. All however are very sturdy and indestructible. The carpets woven inside of the cities, such as Kashmar, Mashad, Mood, Sabzevar, and Birjand are usually better quality than those woven by the nomads in the area. Although it was originally the nomads who wove these rugs for their own use, the cities adapted the talent and perfected it into an art. Almost every color can be seen in various rugs of this type. Almost all of these rugs have a pile of all wool, and a foundation (warp and weft) of cotton. In extremely rare cases, silk may be seen in these rugs as part of the pile, foundation, or the entire carpet might be made of silk. That is very unlikely unless you are dealing with much older pieces from a couple of centuries ago. The wool however, is very lustrous and soft and is exclusive to the people of Khorassan. This fine wool, along with beautiful designs and genius craftsmanship, combine to produce these exquisite carpets."

      Taleghan Rugs
      Rugs woven in this region have amazing quality renowned and recognized all over the world. The rugs woven in major cities of central Iran cannot even be compared to the village rugs. Often, a professional weaver in one of these cities will work non-stop on a rug for many years. The famous asymmetrical Persian knot is only used in the weaving of these fine rugs. The materials can be all wool, all silk or a precise ratio of the two. The foundation (warp and weft) of the rugs is cotton except in very fine pieces where it is pure silk. Countless handmade Persian rugs made in such cities as Kashan, Yazd, or Kerman, have been known to last several hundred years. That just goes to show that it is not an exaggeration when stated that these rugs are the highest quality carpeting in the world. The rugs produced in the major cities of this region are far superior in quality and symmetry to the ones produced in the outskirts. However, the tribal rugs of this region are some of the best tribal rugs of Iran. No words can describe the beauty that these rugs bring to one"s home.

      Songhore Rugs
      Kurdish rugs, like all other Persian rugs are all 100% handmade. They are made of pure wool which is spun from the weaver's own sheep. In very rare cases you might find a carpet that has silk in the pile, and you will often see the foundation of Kurdish rugs being made of goat hair. The pile however, is always wool. The weaving quality in Kurdish rugs varies from loose to dense knotting and the Persian asymmetrical knot is used more than the Turkish symmetrical knot. The colors are attained mainly from natural vegetable dyes. The color schemes of most Kurdish rugs are bright and vibrant. Unlike most people in the western world who like faded and muted colors, the Kurds love bright lively colors. These exciting rugs bring life to these simple people's dull homes. All Kurdish rugs are rugged and long lasting as they have proved to be for thousands of years.

      Yazd Rugs
      Rugs woven in this region have amazing quality renowned and recognized all over the world. The rugs woven in major cities of central Iran cannot even be compared to the village rugs. Often, a professional weaver in one of these cities will work non-stop on a rug for many years. The famous asymmetrical Persian knot is only used in the weaving of these fine rugs. The materials can be all wool, all silk or a precise ratio of the two. The foundation (warp and weft) of the rugs is cotton except in very fine pieces where it is pure silk. Countless handmade Persian rugs made in such cities as Kashan, Yazd, or Kerman, have been known to last several hundred years. That just goes to show that it is not an exaggeration when stated that these rugs are the highest quality carpeting in the world. The rugs produced in the major cities of this region are far superior in quality and symmetry to the ones produced in the outskirts. However, the tribal rugs of this region are some of the best tribal rugs of Iran. No words can describe the beauty that these rugs bring to one's home.

      Mood Rugs
      "There are many grades of handmade rugs produced in this vast Persian province of Khorassan, ranging from medium to fine. All however are very sturdy and indestructible. The carpets woven inside of the cities, such as Kashmar, Mashad, Mood, Sabzevar, and Birjand are usually better quality than those woven by the nomads in the area. Although it was originally the nomads who wove these rugs for their own use, the cities adapted the talent and perfected it into an art. Almost every color can be seen in various rugs of this type. Almost all of these rugs have a pile of all wool, and a foundation (warp and weft) of cotton. In extremely rare cases, silk may be seen in these rugs as part of the pile, foundation, or the entire carpet might be made of silk. That is very unlikely unless you are dealing with much older pieces from a couple of centuries ago. The wool however, is very lustrous and soft and is exclusive to the people of Khorassan. This fine wool, along with beautiful designs and genius craftsmanship, combine to produce these exquisite carpets."

      Qashqai Rugs
      These rugs of this southern region of Iran are hand-woven usually with symmetrical Turkish knots up-to a density of 100 knots per sq. in. The wrap and weft structure is strong, durable cotton or in some cases, goat hair. The pile of the rugs is made of very lustrous and fine wool that has been shorn from local herds of sheep, and colored mainly with natural vegetable and root dyes. The simple and gentle weavers here are very fond of bright lively colors because it brings enchantment to their plain and primitive homes. These rugs are truly unique and priceless treasures, which took these benevolent nomadic weavers months to complete. There will absolutely never be a duplicate of one of these rugs anywhere. There might be a piece similar to another, but never one identical to another. This is because each rug is a self expression of that individual weaver and there is no paper design or blueprint used. This is what makes these rugs so special and unique.

      Sanandaj Rugs
      Kurdish rugs, like all other Persian rugs are all 100% green handmade. They are made of pure wool which is spun from the weaver's own sheep. In very rare cases you might find a carpet that has silk in the pile, and you will often see the foundation of Kurdish rugs being made of goat hair. The pile however, is always wool. The weaving quality in Kurdish rugs varies from loose to dense knotting and the Persian asymmetrical knot is used more than the Turkish symmetrical knot. The colors are attained mainly from natural vegetable dyes. The color schemes of most Kurdish rugs are bright and vibrant. Unlike most people in the western world who like faded and muted colors, the Kurds love bright lively colors. These exciting rugs bring life to these simple people's dull homes. All Kurdish rugs are rugged and long lasting as they have proved to be for thousands of years.

      Shahsavan Rugs
      Weavers of these regions usually use their own symmetrical Turkish double knotting style, which tends to be dense and tightly packed down. The asymmetrical Persian knot can also be seen in cities such as Ardabil. The pile of these rugs is thick lustrous wool, handspun from local sheep. Cotton is the material of choice for the foundation because it is very strong. However, goat hair can also be seen in some Turkish tribal carpets. In a few regions such as Ardabil, silk is blended in with the wool pile to produce a gorgeous rug. Natural vegetable and root dyes are mainly used for the coloring of the rugs. These rugs are generally very sturdy and hardwearing and they still use the brilliant weaving techniques that they used thousands of years ago.

      Tabatabaie Rugs
      A Tabriz rug is an example of astounding and excellent skill that one comes to expect from Persian craftsmanship. The makers of these rugs take such pride in their product, that they often weave their signature in a small part of the carpet's border. These signatures are found on extremely fine rugs made in other cities as well. The material used in these rugs, are wool, silk, or a combination of the two. A beautiful blend of wool and silk is the most common in fine Tabriz's and pure wool is used in the medium quality ones. Often, in finer Tabriz carpets, the foundation of the rug is pure silk as opposed to cotton. Some carpets of Tabriz have 18 or 24 karat gold threads for the foundation of the rug. 300 to well over 500 knots per square inch are not uncommon in fine rugs from Tabriz. The only rugs that can be compared with a fine Tabriz are Isfahans, Qums, and Nains. The Tabriz Persian rug is an absolutely gorgeous piece of art on which no dollar value can be placed and it is without a doubt, one of the most beautiful things to ever be placed on a floor.

      Touserkan Rugs
      Kurdish rugs, like all other Persian rugs are all 100% handmade. They are made of pure wool which is spun from the weaver's own sheep. In very rare cases you might find a carpet that has silk in the pile, and you will often see the foundation of Kurdish rugs being made of goat hair. The pile however, is always wool. The weaving quality in Kurdish rugs varies from loose to dense knotting and the Persian asymmetrical knot is used more than the Turkish symmetrical knot. The colors are attained mainly from natural vegetable dyes. The color schemes of most Kurdish rugs are bright and vibrant. Unlike most people in the western world who like faded and muted colors, the Kurds love bright lively colors. These exciting rugs bring life to these simple people's dull homes. All Kurdish rugs are rugged and long lasting as they have proved to be for thousands of years.

      Nahavand Rugs
      The rugs manufactured around the city of Hamedan are all handmade, with the pile being entirely wool, and the colors being mainly natural vegetable dyes. Very rarely if ever, is silk seen in rugs from this region. The foundation of the rug (warp and weft) is usually cotton, and in some cases goat hair. The patterns are usually simple geometric arrangements with primary and vibrant colors. Sometimes small animals or garden elements are seen and sometimes the famous Herati design is implemented. These rugs are overall very good in quality and most of them have been known to last surprisingly long periods of time.

      Qum Rugs
      A Qum rug is an example of astounding and excellent craftsmanship that one comes to expect from the Persian people of Iran. The makers of these rugs take such pride in their product, that they often weave their signature in a small part of the carpet's border. Weaver signatures are found on extremely fine rugs made in other cities as well. There can be many different shapes and sizes in these rugs, including squares, rectangles, ovals, round rugs, or wall hangings, and the sizes may vary from a small mat to a rug the size of city block. The materials used can be wool, silk, or any combination of the two.

      Shiraz Rugs
      These rugs of this southern region of Iran are hand-woven usually with symmetrical Turkish knots up-to a density of 100 knots per sq. in. The wrap and weft structure is strong, durable cotton or in some cases, goat hair. The pile of the rugs is made of very lustrous and fine wool that has been shorn from local herds of sheep, and colored mainly with natural vegetable and root dyes. The simple and gentle weavers here are very fond of bright lively colors because it brings enchantment to their plain and primitive homes. These rugs are truly unique and priceless treasures, which took these benevolent nomadic weavers months to complete. There will absolutely never be a duplicate of one of these rugs anywhere. There might be a piece similar to another, but never one identical to another. This is because each rug is a self expression of that individual weaver and there is no paper design or blueprint used. This is what makes these rugs so special and unique.

      Tabriz Rugs
      A Tabriz rug is an example of astounding and excellent skill that one comes to expect from Persian craftsmanship. The makers of these rugs take such pride in their product, that they often weave their signature in a small part of the carpet's border. These signatures are found on extremely fine rugs made in other cities as well. The material used in these rugs, are wool, silk, or a combination of the two. A beautiful blend of wool and silk is the most common in fine Tabriz's and pure wool is used in the medium quality ones. Often, in finer Tabriz carpets, the foundation of the rug is pure silk as opposed to cotton. Some carpets of Tabriz have 18 or 24 karat gold threads for the foundation of the rug. 300 to well over 500 knots per square inch are not uncommon in fine rugs from Tabriz. The only rugs that can be compared with a fine Tabriz are Isfahans, Qums, and Nains. The Tabriz Persian rug is an absolutely gorgeous piece of art on which no dollar value can be placed and it is without a doubt, one of the most beautiful things to ever be placed on a floor.

      Turkoman Rugs
      Weavers of these regions usually use their own symmetrical Turkish double knotting style, which tends to be dense and tightly packed down. The asymmetrical Persian knot can also be seen in cities such as Ardabil. The pile of these rugs is thick lustrous wool, handspun from local sheep. Cotton is the material of choice for the foundation because it is very strong. However, goat hair can also be seen in some Turkish tribal carpets. In a few regions such as Ardabil, silk is blended in with the wool pile to produce a gorgeous rug. Natural vegetable and root dyes are mainly used for the coloring of the rugs. These rugs are generally very sturdy and hardwearing and they still use the brilliant weaving techniques that they used thousands of years ago.

      Zanjan Rugs
      The people of the northern regions of Iran have a long history of weaving durable rugs. The tribal pieces made here are always wool pile. The foundation of the rugs can either be cotton or goat hair. The coloring is mainly done with the use of natural vegetable dyes. The Persian asymmetrical knot is used much more often than the symmetrical Turkish double knot. The Persian knot is always more precise and much finer. The construction of these rugs is very difficult for these people because they live nomadically, far away from the conveniences of modern technology. They make their own looms, which are placed horizantally on the ground, and easily dismantled and transportable. The pile is usually thick and soft. A very durable floor piece, the rugs of northern Iran last a very long time.

      Nain Rugs
      Nains are magnificently hand-woven by talented master weavers who may take several years to complete a single rug. Though very similar in appearance to Isfahan rugs, they are easily identifiable and singled out because of their distinctive color scheme and smooth, closely clipped pile. Nains usually feature an overall arabesque and curvilinear floral pattern of blues, greens and whites against a warm beige or ivory background. Over 300 to 500 knots per square inch are not uncommon in Nains. Excellent grades of wool and silk are used exclusively on a foundation of fine cotton or silk. The Nain rug is a precious treasure that will always bring elegance to any room and its beauty will forever remain priceless.

      Sarough Rugs
      "There are many different grades of rugs made in this region, ranging from medium to fine. All rugs however, are 100% handmade and authentic. The material used for the pile of the rugs is wool, with the colors being mainly vegetable dyes. The rugs are woven using asymmetrical Persian knots to tie each loop one by one. Although not uncommon in older or antique pieces, silk pile or silk foundation is rarely if ever seen here. There might be some cases where the rug has a pile of silk and wool blend. Cotton or goat hair is used for the foundation (more so cotton) and the wool of the rugs is hand spun usually from the weaver's own sheep. The Sarough is probably the most famous of all the rugs from this region and its quality is absolutely exceptional. The Mahal, Ferahan, Seraband, and Mir are also very high in quality, but that is not to say that the rugs from the other villages are inferior in quality. They as well are very durable and are capable of lasting an incredibly long period of time. "

      Sirjan Rugs
      These rugs of this southern region of Iran are hand-woven usually with symmetrical Turkish knots up-to a density of 100 knots per sq. in. The wrap and weft structure is strong, durable cotton or in some cases, goat hair. The pile of the rugs is made of very lustrous and fine wool that has been shorn from local herds of sheep, and colored mainly with natural vegetable and root dyes. The simple and gentle weavers here are very fond of bright lively colors because it brings enchantment to their plain and primitive homes. These rugs are truly unique and priceless treasures, which took these benevolent nomadic weavers months to complete. There will absolutely never be a duplicate of one of these rugs anywhere. There might be a piece similar to another, but never one identical to another. This is because each rug is a self expression of that individual weaver and there is no paper design or blueprint used. This is what makes these rugs so special and unique.

      Tafresh Rugs
      Rugs woven in this region have amazing quality renowned and recognized all over the world. The rugs woven in major cities of central Iran cannot even be compared to the village rugs. Often, a professional weaver in one of these cities will work non-stop on a rug for many years. The famous asymmetrical Persian knot is only used in the weaving of these fine rugs. The materials can be all wool, all silk or a precise ratio of the two. The foundation (warp and weft) of the rugs is cotton except in very fine pieces where it is pure silk. Countless handmade Persian rugs made in such cities as Kashan, Yazd, or Kerman, have been known to last several hundred years. That just goes to show that it is not an exaggeration when stated that these rugs are the highest quality carpeting in the world. The rugs produced in the major cities of this region are far superior in quality and symmetry to the ones produced in the outskirts. However, the tribal rugs of this region are some of the best tribal rugs of Iran. No words can describe the beauty that these rugs bring to one"s home.

      Abadeh Rugs
      These rugs of this southern region of Iran are hand-woven usually with symmetrical Turkish knots up-to a density of 100 knots per sq. in. The wrap and weft structure is strong, durable cotton or in some cases, goat hair. The pile of the rugs is made of very lustrous and fine wool that has been shorn from local herds of sheep, and colored mainly with natural vegetable and root dyes. The simple and gentle weavers here are very fond of bright lively colors because it brings enchantment to their plain and primitive homes. These rugs are truly unique and priceless treasures, which took these benevolent nomadic weavers months to complete. There will absolutely never be a duplicate of one of these rugs anywhere. There might be a piece similar to another, but never one identical to another. This is because each rug is a self expression of that individual weaver and there is no paper design or blueprint used. This is what makes these rugs so special and unique.

      Arak Rugs
      "There are many different grades of rugs made in this region, ranging from medium to fine. All rugs however, are 100% handmade and authentic. The material used for the pile of the rugs is wool, with the colors being mainly vegetable dyes. The rugs are woven using asymmetrical Persian knots to tie each loop one by one. Although not uncommon in older or antique pieces, silk pile or silk foundation is rarely if ever seen here. There might be some cases where the rug has a pile of silk and wool blend. Cotton or goat hair is used for the foundation (more so cotton) and the wool of the rugs is hand spun usually from the weaver's own sheep. The Sarough is probably the most famous of all the rugs from this region and its quality is absolutely exceptional. The Mahal, Ferahan, Seraband, and Mir are also very high in quality, but that is not to say that the rugs from the other villages are inferior in quality. They as well are very durable and are capable of lasting an incredibly long period of time. "

      Bidjar Rugs
      Kurdish rugs, like all other Persian rugs are all 100% handmade. They are made of pure wool which is spun from the weaver's own sheep. In very rare cases you might find a carpet that has silk in the pile, and you will often see the foundation of Kurdish rugs being made of goat hair. The pile however, is always wool. The weaving quality in Kurdish rugs varies from loose to dense knotting and the Persian asymmetrical knot is used more than the Turkish symmetrical knot. The colors are attained mainly from natural vegetable dyes. The color schemes of most Kurdish rugs are bright and vibrant. Unlike most people in the western world who like faded and muted colors, the Kurds love bright lively colors. These exciting rugs bring life to these simple people's dull homes. All Kurdish rugs are rugged and long lasting as they have proved to be for thousands of years.

      Chenar Rugs
      The rugs manufactured around the city of Hamedan are all handmade, with the pile being entirely wool, and the colors being mainly natural vegetable dyes. Very rarely if ever, is silk seen in rugs from this region. The foundation of the rug (warp and weft) is usually cotton, and in some cases goat hair. The patterns are usually simple geometric arrangements with primary and vibrant colors. Sometimes small animals or garden elements are seen and sometimes the famous Herati design is implemented. These rugs are overall very good in quality and most of them have been known to last surprisingly long periods of time.

      Gharadjeh Rugs
      Weavers of these regions usually use their own symmetrical Turkish double knotting style, which tends to be dense and tightly packed down. The asymmetrical Persian knot can also be seen in cities such as Ardabil. The pile of these rugs is thick lustrous wool, handspun from local sheep. Cotton is the material of choice for the foundation because it is very strong. However, goat hair can also be seen in some Turkish tribal carpets. In a few regions such as Ardabil, silk is blended in with the wool pile to produce a gorgeous rug. Natural vegetable and root dyes are mainly used for the coloring of the rugs. These rugs are generally very sturdy and hardwearing and they still use the brilliant weaving techniques that they used thousands of years ago.

      Isfahan Rugs
      There can be many combinations in the materials used for Isfahans. These are: wool on cotton, wool and silk blend on cotton, wool and silk blend on silk, or silk on silk. The most common is a superb blend of wool and silk used for the pile, woven on a foundation of pure silk. Unlike the intuitive execution of tribal weavers who weave rugs on remembered motifs and learned ornamentation, the complex colors, shapes and 'Arabesque' swirls of the Isfahan are first carefully drawn on large sheets of paper in the form of a template by a master designer. The template then serves as a guide for the weavers to ensure accuracy and quality control throughout the long weaving process, which can be several years. There are literally hundreds of commercially operated vertical looms at work in Isfahan at all times to meet demand. An authentic fine Isfahan rug is absolutely priceless and without exaggeration, the most gorgeous thing that can be placed on any floor.

      Kerman Rugs
      Rugs woven in this region have amazing quality renowned and recognized all over the world. The rugs woven in major cities of central Iran cannot even be compared to the village rugs. Often, a professional weaver in one of these cities will work non-stop on a rug for many years. The famous asymmetrical Persian knot is only used in the weaving of these fine rugs. The materials can be all wool, all silk or a precise ratio of the two. The foundation (warp and weft) of the rugs is cotton except in very fine pieces where it is pure silk. Countless handmade Persian rugs made in such cities as Kashan, Yazd, or Kerman, have been known to last several hundred years. That just goes to show that it is not an exaggeration when stated that these rugs are the highest quality carpeting in the world. The rugs produced in the major cities of this region are far superior in quality and symmetry to the ones produced in the outskirts. However, the tribal rugs of this region are some of the best tribal rugs of Iran. No words can describe the beauty that these rugs bring to one's home.

      Lori Rugs
      Kurdish rugs, like all other Persian rugs are all 100% handmade. They are made of pure wool which is spun from the weaver's own sheep. In very rare cases you might find a carpet that has silk in the pile, and you will often see the foundation of Kurdish rugs being made of goat hair. The pile however, is always wool. The weaving quality in Kurdish rugs varies from loose to dense knotting and the Persian asymmetrical knot is used more than the Turkish symmetrical knot. The colors are attained mainly from natural vegetable dyes. The color schemes of most Kurdish rugs are bright and vibrant. Unlike most people in the western world who like faded and muted colors, the Kurds love bright lively colors. These exciting rugs bring life to these simple people's dull homes. All Kurdish rugs are rugged and long lasting as they have proved to be for thousands of years.

      Malayer Rugs
      "There are many different grades of rugs made in this region, ranging from medium to fine. All rugs however, are 100% handmade and authentic. The material used for the pile of the rugs is wool, with the colors being mainly vegetable dyes. The rugs are woven using asymmetrical Persian knots to tie each loop one by one. Although not uncommon in older or antique pieces, silk pile or silk foundation is rarely if ever seen here. There might be some cases where the rug has a pile of silk and wool blend. Cotton or goat hair is used for the foundation (more so cotton) and the wool of the rugs is hand spun usually from the weaver's own sheep. The Sarough is probably the most famous of all the rugs from this region and its quality is absolutely exceptional. The Mahal, Ferahan, Seraband, and Mir are also very high in quality, but that is not to say that the rugs from the other villages are inferior in quality. They as well are very durable and are capable of lasting an incredibly long period of time. "

      Ardabil Rugs
      Weavers of these regions usually use their own symmetrical Turkish double knotting style, which tends to be dense and tightly packed down. The asymmetrical Persian knot can also be seen in cities such as Ardabil. The pile of these rugs is thick lustrous wool, handspun from local sheep. Cotton is the material of choice for the foundation because it is very strong. However, goat hair can also be seen in some Turkish tribal carpets. In a few regions such as Ardabil, silk is blended in with the wool pile to produce a gorgeous rug. Natural vegetable and root dyes are mainly used for the coloring of the rugs. These rugs are generally very sturdy and hardwearing and they still use the brilliant weaving techniques that they used thousands of years ago.

      Birjand Rugs
      "There are many grades of handmade rugs produced in this vast Persian province of Khorassan, ranging from medium to fine. All however are very sturdy and indestructible. The carpets woven inside of the cities, such as Kashmar, Mashad, Mood, Sabzevar, and Birjand are usually better quality than those woven by the nomads in the area. Although it was originally the nomads who wove these rugs for their own use, the cities adapted the talent and perfected it into an art. Almost every color can be seen in various rugs of this type. Almost all of these rugs have a pile of all wool, and a foundation (warp and weft) of cotton. In extremely rare cases, silk may be seen in these rugs as part of the pile, foundation, or the entire carpet might be made of silk. That is very unlikely unless you are dealing with much older pieces from a couple of centuries ago. The wool however, is very lustrous and soft and is exclusive to the people of Khorassan. This fine wool, along with beautiful designs and genius craftsmanship, combine to produce these exquisite carpets."

      Ferahan Rugs
      Kurdish rugs, like all other Persian rugs are all 100% handmade. They are made of pure wool which is spun from the weaver's own sheep. In very rare cases you might find a carpet that has silk in the pile, and you will often see the foundation of Kurdish rugs being made of goat hair. The pile however, is always wool. The weaving quality in Kurdish rugs varies from loose to dense knotting and the Persian asymmetrical knot is used more than the Turkish symmetrical knot. The colors are attained mainly from natural vegetable dyes. The color schemes of most Kurdish rugs are bright and vibrant. Unlike most people in the western world who like faded and muted colors, the Kurds love bright lively colors. These exciting rugs bring life to these simple people's dull homes. All Kurdish rugs are rugged and long lasting as they have proved to be for thousands of years.

      Ghoochan Rugs
      "There are many grades of handmade rugs produced in this vast Persian province of Khorassan, ranging from medium to fine. All however are very sturdy and indestructible. The carpets woven inside of the cities, such as Kashmar, Mashad, Mood, Sabzevar, and Birjand are usually better quality than those woven by the nomads in the area. Although it was originally the nomads who wove these rugs for their own use, the cities adapted the talent and perfected it into an art. Almost every color can be seen in various rugs of this type. Almost all of these rugs have a pile of all wool, and a foundation (warp and weft) of cotton. In extremely rare cases, silk may be seen in these rugs as part of the pile, foundation, or the entire carpet might be made of silk. That is very unlikely unless you are dealing with much older pieces from a couple of centuries ago. The wool however, is very lustrous and soft and is exclusive to the people of Khorassan. This fine wool, along with beautiful designs and genius craftsmanship, combine to produce these exquisite carpets."

      Hashtrood Rugs
      The people of the northern regions of Iran have a long history of weaving durable rugs. The tribal pieces made here are always wool pile. The foundation of the rugs can either be cotton or goat hair. The coloring is mainly done with the use of natural vegetable dyes. The Persian asymmetrical knot is used much more often than the symmetrical Turkish double knot. The Persian knot is always more precise and much finer. The construction of these rugs is very difficult for these people because they live nomadically, far away from the conveniences of modern technology. They make their own looms, which are placed horizantally on the ground, and easily dismantled and transportable. The pile is usually thick and soft. A very durable floor piece, the rugs of northern Iran last a very long time.

      Kashan Rugs
      Rugs woven in this region have amazing quality renowned and recognized all over the world. The rugs woven in major cities of central Iran cannot even be compared to the village rugs. Often, a professional weaver in one of these cities will work non-stop on a rug for many years. The famous asymmetrical Persian knot is only used in the weaving of these fine rugs. The materials can be all wool, all silk or a precise ratio of the two. The foundation (warp and weft) of the rugs is cotton except in very fine pieces where it is pure silk. Countless handmade Persian rugs made in such cities as Kashan, Yazd, or Kerman, have been known to last several hundred years. That just goes to show that it is not an exaggeration when stated that these rugs are the highest quality carpeting in the world. The rugs produced in the major cities of this region are far superior in quality and symmetry to the ones produced in the outskirts. However, the tribal rugs of this region are some of the best tribal rugs of Iran. No words can describe the beauty that these rugs bring to one"s home.

      Lylyan Rugs
      Kurdish rugs, like all other Persian rugs are all 100% handmade. They are made of pure wool which is spun from the weaver's own sheep. In very rare cases you might find a carpet that has silk in the pile, and you will often see the foundation of Kurdish rugs being made of goat hair. The pile however, is always wool. The weaving quality in Kurdish rugs varies from loose to dense knotting and the Persian asymmetrical knot is used more than the Turkish symmetrical knot. The colors are attained mainly from natural vegetable dyes. The color schemes of most Kurdish rugs are bright and vibrant. Unlike most people in the western world who like faded and muted colors, the Kurds love bright lively colors. These exciting rugs bring life to these simple people's dull homes. All Kurdish rugs are rugged and long lasting as they have proved to be for thousands of years.

      Mashad Rugs
      "There are many grades of handmade rugs produced in this vast Persian province of Khorassan, ranging from medium to fine. All however are very sturdy and indestructible. The carpets woven inside of the cities, such as Kashmar, Mashad, Mood, Sabzevar, and Birjand are usually better quality than those woven by the nomads in the area. Although it was originally the nomads who wove these rugs for their own use, the cities adapted the talent and perfected it into an art. Almost every color can be seen in various rugs of this type. Almost all of these rugs have a pile of all wool, and a foundation (warp and weft) of cotton. In extremely rare cases, silk may be seen in these rugs as part of the pile, foundation, or the entire carpet might be made of silk. That is very unlikely unless you are dealing with much older pieces from a couple of centuries ago. The wool however, is very lustrous and soft and is exclusive to the people of Khorassan. This fine wool, along with beautiful designs and genius craftsmanship, combine to produce these exquisite carpets."

      Bakhtiari Rugs
      Bahktiaris generally last a long time because of their extreme durability. Even though these are tribal products, often produced under the most primitive conditions, the materials, design traditions and knotting styles have remained constant over the centuries resulting in works of brilliant textile art. Most weavers use fine quality wool from their own sheep, which is thoroughly spun by hand and then given intense coloration mainly with vegetable dyes extracted from local plants and grasses in accordance with century old formulas. An authentic Bakhtiari rug is incredibly rigid and very dense making it very strong and immune against damage.

      Afshar Rugs
      These rugs of this southern region of Iran are hand-woven usually with symmetrical Turkish knots up-to a density of 100 knots per sq. in. The wrap and weft structure is strong, durable cotton or in some cases, goat hair. The pile of the rugs is made of very lustrous and fine wool that has been shorn from local herds of sheep, and colored mainly with natural vegetable and root dyes. The simple and gentle weavers here are very fond of bright lively colors because it brings enchantment to their plain and primitive homes. These rugs are truly unique and priceless treasures, which took these benevolent nomadic weavers months to complete. There will absolutely never be a duplicate of one of these rugs anywhere. There might be a piece similar to another, but never one identical to another. This is because each rug is a self expression of that individual weaver and there is no paper design or blueprint used. This is what makes these rugs so special and unique.

      Ferdos Rugs
      "There are many grades of handmade rugs produced in this vast Persian province of Khorassan, ranging from medium to fine. All however are very sturdy and indestructible. The carpets woven inside of the cities, such as Kashmar, Mashad, Mood, Sabzevar, and Birjand are usually better quality than those woven by the nomads in the area. Although it was originally the nomads who wove these rugs for their own use, the cities adapted the talent and perfected it into an art. Almost every color can be seen in various rugs of this type. Almost all of these rugs have a pile of all wool, and a foundation (warp and weft) of cotton. In extremely rare cases, silk may be seen in these rugs as part of the pile, foundation, or the entire carpet might be made of silk. That is very unlikely unless you are dealing with much older pieces from a couple of centuries ago. The wool however, is very lustrous and soft and is exclusive to the people of Khorassan. This fine wool, along with beautiful designs and genius craftsmanship, combine to produce these exquisite carpets."

      Goltogh Rugs
      Kurdish rugs, like all other Persian rugs are all 100% handmade. They are made of pure wool which is spun from the weaver's own sheep. In very rare cases you might find a carpet that has silk in the pile, and you will often see the foundation of Kurdish rugs being made of goat hair. The pile however, is always wool. The weaving quality in Kurdish rugs varies from loose to dense knotting and the Persian asymmetrical knot is used more than the Turkish symmetrical knot. The colors are attained mainly from natural vegetable dyes. The color schemes of most Kurdish rugs are bright and vibrant. Unlike most people in the western world who like faded and muted colors, the Kurds love bright lively colors. These exciting rugs bring life to these simple people's dull homes. All Kurdish rugs are rugged and long lasting as they have proved to be for thousands of years.

      Heriz Rugs
      Weavers of these regions usually use their own symmetrical Turkish double knotting style, which tends to be dense and tightly packed down. The asymmetrical Persian knot can also be seen in cities such as Ardabil. The pile of these rugs is thick lustrous wool, handspun from local sheep. Cotton is the material of choice for the foundation because it is very strong. However, goat hair can also be seen in some Turkish tribal carpets. In a few regions such as Ardabil, silk is blended in with the wool pile to produce a gorgeous rug. Natural vegetable and root dyes are mainly used for the coloring of the rugs. These rugs are generally very sturdy and hardwearing and they still use the brilliant weaving techniques that they used thousands of years ago.

      Khamseh Rugs
      Kurdish rugs, like all other Persian rugs are all 100% handmade. They are made of pure wool which is spun from the weaver's own sheep. In very rare cases you might find a carpet that has silk in the pile, and you will often see the foundation of Kurdish rugs being made of goat hair. The pile however, is always wool. The weaving quality in Kurdish rugs varies from loose to dense knotting and the Persian asymmetrical knot is used more than the Turkish symmetrical knot. The colors are attained mainly from natural vegetable dyes. The color schemes of most Kurdish rugs are bright and vibrant. Unlike most people in the western world who like faded and muted colors, the Kurds love bright lively colors. These exciting rugs bring life to these simple people's dull homes. All Kurdish rugs are rugged and long lasting as they have proved to be for thousands of years.

      Mahabad Rugs
      Weavers of these regions usually use their own symmetrical Turkish double knotting style, which tends to be dense and tightly packed down. The asymmetrical Persian knot can also be seen in cities such as Ardabil. The pile of these rugs is thick lustrous wool, handspun from local sheep. Cotton is the material of choice for the foundation because it is very strong. However, goat hair can also be seen in some Turkish tribal carpets. In a few regions such as Ardabil, silk is blended in with the wool pile to produce a gorgeous rug. Natural vegetable and root dyes are mainly used for the coloring of the rugs. These rugs are generally very sturdy and hardwearing and they still use the brilliant weaving techniques that they used thousands of years ago.

      Maymeh Rugs
      Rugs woven in this region have amazing quality renowned and recognized all over the world. The rugs woven in major cities of central Iran cannot even be compared to the village rugs. Often, a professional weaver in one of these cities will work non-stop on a rug for many years. The famous asymmetrical Persian knot is only used in the weaving of these fine rugs. The materials can be all wool, all silk or a precise ratio of the two. The foundation (warp and weft) of the rugs is cotton except in very fine pieces where it is pure silk. Countless handmade Persian rugs made in such cities as Kashan, Yazd, or Kerman, have been known to last several hundred years. That just goes to show that it is not an exaggeration when stated that these rugs are the highest quality carpeting in the world. The rugs produced in the major cities of this region are far superior in quality and symmetry to the ones produced in the outskirts. However, the tribal rugs of this region are some of the best tribal rugs of Iran. No words can describe the beauty that these rugs bring to one's home.

      Baluch Rugs
      Baluchi weavers use the asymmetrical Persian knot almost exclusively. Knots tend to be small and tightly packed down. The pile is thick lustrous wool, handspun from local camel or sheep. Cotton is the material of choice for the warp (vertical threads around which individual knots are looped) because it is both strong and more economic than wool. However, goat hair still predominates as tribal warp material. The weft (horizontal strings) of the understructure may be strong spun goat hair, camel wool or cotton. Natural vegetable dyes are mainly used which ensures color purity that will form a soft, subtle patina with time and use. The Baluch rugs are very well built and they usually last a very long time.

      Boroujerd Rugs
      Rugs woven in this region have amazing quality renowned and recognized all over the world. The rugs woven in major cities of central Iran cannot even be compared to the village rugs. Often, a professional weaver in one of these cities will work non-stop on a rug for many years. The famous asymmetrical Persian knot is only used in the weaving of these fine rugs. The materials can be all wool, all silk or a precise ratio of the two. The foundation (warp and weft) of the rugs is cotton except in very fine pieces where it is pure silk. Countless handmade Persian rugs made in such cities as Kashan, Yazd, or Kerman, have been known to last several hundred years. That just goes to show that it is not an exaggeration when stated that these rugs are the highest quality carpeting in the world. The rugs produced in the major cities of this region are far superior in quality and symmetry to the ones produced in the outskirts. However, the tribal rugs of this region are some of the best tribal rugs of Iran. No words can describe the beauty that these rugs bring to one"s home.

      Gabbeh Rugs
      These rugs of this southern region of Iran are hand-woven usually with symmetrical Turkish knots up-to a density of 100 knots per sq. in. The wrap and weft structure is strong, durable cotton or in some cases, goat hair. The pile of the rugs is made of very lustrous and fine wool that has been shorn from local herds of sheep, and colored mainly with natural vegetable and root dyes. The simple and gentle weavers here are very fond of bright lively colors because it brings enchantment to their plain and primitive homes. These rugs are truly unique and priceless treasures, which took these benevolent nomadic weavers months to complete. There will absolutely never be a duplicate of one of these rugs anywhere. There might be a piece similar to another, but never one identical to another. This is because each rug is a self expression of that individual weaver and there is no paper design or blueprint used. This is what makes these rugs so special and unique.

      Goravan Rugs
      Weavers of these regions usually use their own symmetrical Turkish double knotting style, which tends to be dense and tightly packed down. The asymmetrical Persian knot can also be seen in cities such as Ardabil. The pile of these rugs is thick lustrous wool, handspun from local sheep. Cotton is the material of choice for the foundation because it is very strong. However, goat hair can also be seen in some Turkish tribal carpets. In a few regions such as Ardabil, silk is blended in with the wool pile to produce a gorgeous rug. Natural vegetable and root dyes are mainly used for the coloring of the rugs. These rugs are generally very sturdy and hardwearing and they still use the brilliant weaving techniques that they used thousands of years ago.

      Hussainabad Rugs
      The rugs manufactured around the city of Hamedan are all handmade, with the pile being entirely wool, and the colors being mainly natural vegetable dyes. Very rarely if ever, is silk seen in rugs from this region. The foundation of the rug (warp and weft) is usually cotton, and in some cases goat hair. The patterns are usually simple geometric arrangements with primary and vibrant colors. Sometimes small animals or garden elements are seen and sometimes the famous Herati design is implemented. These rugs are overall very good in quality and most of them have been known to last surprisingly long periods of time.

      Kelardasht Rugs
      The people of the northern regions of Iran have a long history of weaving durable rugs. The tribal pieces made here are always wool pile. The foundation of the rugs can either be cotton or goat hair. The coloring is mainly done with the use of natural vegetable dyes. The Persian asymmetrical knot is used much more often than the symmetrical Turkish double knot. The Persian knot is always more precise and much finer. The construction of these rugs is very difficult for these people because they live nomadically, far away from the conveniences of modern technology. They make their own looms, which are placed horizantally on the ground, and easily dismantled and transportable. The pile is usually thick and soft. A very durable floor piece, the rugs of northern Iran last a very long time.

      Koliai Rugs Kurdish rugs, like all other Persian rugs are all 100% handmade. They are made of pure wool which is spun from the weaver's own sheep. In very rare cases you might find a carpet that has silk in the pile, and you will often see the foundation of Kurdish rugs being made of goat hair. The pile however, is always wool. The weaving quality in Kurdish rugs varies from loose to dense knotting and the Persian asymmetrical knot is used more than the Turkish symmetrical knot. The colors are attained mainly from natural vegetable dyes. The color schemes of most Kurdish rugs are bright and vibrant. Unlike most people in the western world who like faded and muted colors, the Kurds love bright lively colors. These exciting rugs bring life to these simple people's dull homes. All Kurdish rugs are rugged and long lasting as they have proved to be for thousands of years.

      Construction of Mahal Rugs
      "There are many different grades of rugs made in this region, ranging from medium to fine. All rugs however, are 100% handmade and authentic. The material used for the pile of the rugs is wool, with the colors being mainly vegetable dyes. The rugs are woven using asymmetrical Persian knots to tie each loop one by one. Although not uncommon in older or antique pieces, silk pile or silk foundation is rarely if ever seen here. There might be some cases where the rug has a pile of silk and wool blend. Cotton or goat hair is used for the foundation (more so cotton) and the wool of the rugs is hand spun usually from the weaver's own sheep. The Sarough is probably the most famous of all the rugs from this region and its quality is absolutely exceptional. The Mahal, Ferahan, Seraband, and Mir are also very high in quality, but that is not to say that the rugs from the other villages are inferior in quality. They as well are very durable and are capable of lasting an incredibly long period of time. "

      Mazlaghan Rugs
      The people of the northern regions of Iran have a long history of weaving durable rugs. The tribal pieces made here are always wool pile. The foundation of the rugs can either be cotton or goat hair. The coloring is mainly done with the use of natural vegetable dyes. The Persian asymmetrical knot is used much more often than the symmetrical Turkish double knot. The Persian knot is always more precise and much finer. The construction of these rugs is very difficult for these people because they live nomadically, far away from the conveniences of modern technology. They make their own looms, which are placed horizantally on the ground, and easily dismantled and transportable. The pile is usually thick and soft. A very durable floor piece, the rugs of northern Iran last a very long time.

      All of these dangerous diseases are transmitted by mosquitoes. These little blood suckers must have a blood meal in order to reproduce so they 'bite' an unsuspecting victim to get some food. But it really isn't a bite at all as they suck blood through a straw-like mouthpiece. As they drain us of our blood, they inject an anti-coagulant to keep the blood flowing and that injected serum is what victims react to. Most people get a minor, irritating and itchy bump that takes a few days to a week to go away.

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