History of Persian and Oriental area rugs




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      Sanandaj Rugs
      Kurdish carpets are woven throughout western Iran, in and around the rugged mountainous region of Kurdistan. The Kurds derive from the ancient nomadic peoples that roamed the area thousands of years ago. They live a semi-nomadic life, either in villages or in moving tribes away from the cities, where they can still carry out their old traditions and live as they did thousands of years ago. A few of the Kurdish tribes of the western regions include the Herki, Senjabi, Gurani, Jaffid, and Kalhors. A few major Kurdish rug-producing centers are Senneh, Bidjar, and the district of Khamseh. Some other Kurdish villages and districts that produce rugs are Borchelu, Goltogh, Khoi, Koliai, Lylyan, Mousel, Nanadj, Songhore, Touserkan, and Zagheh. As you can see, the Kurds are well established, and historic semi-nomadic and/or nomadic peoples of Iran who date back thousands of years. Many other major rug producing centers of Iran, such as Hamadan, Lorestan, or even Arak show obvious traces of Kurdish influence. Sometimes they incorporate the style and techniques of the Turkish people of Iran, who are also very widespread. The Kurds are a very peaceful and gentle group who prefer their simple nomadic lives to the complexities and frustrations of the modern technological world.

      Meshkinshahr Rugs
      This ancient region of Iran is very renowned for rug weaving. It has a rich history that dates back a long time. Here, in these rugged and mountainous conditions, much like many other parts of Iran, almost all the men and women have the talent and skill to weave high quality carpets by hand, with no use of modern technology whatsoever. In some cases, rug weaving is the family's main source of income. They trade the rugs in nearby cities with local merchants for staples and necessities of the home. A few regions and towns that are included in this Turkish region of Iran are Ardabil, Bakhshaish, Gharadjeh (Gharabagh), Goravan, Heriz, Mehriban, Sarab, and Shahsavan. Their weaving style originates partly from Mongols who invaded Iran in the 13th century, and settled the northwest. This historic region of Iran and some parts of Turkey and Uzbekistan have really been significant in the forming of the present day carpet industry. Carpet weaving has long been a custom of theirs and they continue to weave them everyday.

      Sabzevar Rugs
      "The Persian province of Khorassan is the biggest province in Iran. It stretches along the northeast of the nation. Many beautiful rugs come from this area of Iran. The capital city is Mashad, which is also where most of these rugs are marketed everyday. Some other rug producing centers in this region are Kashmar (Turshis), Mood, Sabzevar, Ghain, and Birjand, most of which are situated very close to Mashad. Many Baluch type rugs are also woven in this province by Baluchi nomads who inhabit the areas more to the south. In 1722 there was an Afghani Invasion into Iran. This left the country in a state of political confusion for many years, and the rug industry in a state of disorientation, especially in well established areas such as Mashad. However, despite the mass invasion, Khorassan along with many other regions were able to get back on their feet and so the rug industry started up again as the royal courts of Iran did everything in their power to bring this great art back home. Many times, Kings of Iran such as Shah Abass would seize and destroy low quality carpets and those with inferior coloring techniques to make sure the integrity of this ancient Persian art wasn't lost. "

      Saveh Rugs This ancient region of Iran is very renowned for rug weaving. It has a rich history that dates back a long time. Here, in these rugged and mountainous conditions, much like many other parts of Iran, almost all the men and women have the talent and skill to weave high quality carpets by hand, with no use of modern technology whatsoever. In some cases, rug weaving is the family's main source of income. They trade the rugs in nearby cities with local merchants for staples and necessities of the home. A few regions and towns that are included in this Turkish region of Iran are Ardabil, Bakhshaish, Gharadjeh (Gharabagh), Goravan, Heriz, Mehriban, Sarab, and Shahsavan. Their weaving style originates partly from Mongols who invaded Iran in the 13th century, and settled the northwest. This historic region of Iran and some parts of Turkey and Uzbekistan have really been significant in the forming of the present day carpet industry. Carpet weaving has long been a custom of theirs and they continue to weave them everyday.

      Songhore Rugs
      Kurdish carpets are woven throughout western Iran, in and around the rugged mountainous region of Kurdistan. The Kurds derive from the ancient nomadic peoples that roamed the area thousands of years ago. They live a semi-nomadic life, either in villages or in moving tribes away from the cities, where they can still carry out their old traditions and live as they did thousands of years ago. A few of the Kurdish tribes of the western regions include the Herki, Senjabi, Gurani, Jaffid, and Kalhors. A few major Kurdish rug-producing centers are Senneh, Bidjar, and the district of Khamseh. Some other Kurdish villages and districts that produce rugs are Borchelu, Goltogh, Khoi, Koliai, Lylyan, Mousel, Nanadj, Songhore, Touserkan, and Zagheh. As you can see, the Kurds are well established, and historic semi-nomadic and/or nomadic peoples of Iran who date back thousands of years. Many other major rug producing centers of Iran, such as Hamadan, Lorestan, or even Arak show obvious traces of Kurdish influence. Sometimes they incorporate the style and techniques of the Turkish people of Iran, who are also very widespread. The Kurds are a very peaceful and gentle group who prefer their simple nomadic lives to the complexities and frustrations of the modern technological world.

      Taleghan Rugs
      Besides the legendary cities of Central Iran such as Tehran, Isfahan, Qum, Nain, Kashan, Yazd, and Kerman that weave amazing quality rugs, there are numerous smaller towns scattered throughout central Iran that weave very high quality carpets as well. Although not as fine as the eminent city rugs, these handmade rugs are still among the highest of quality in the world. Some of these small towns south of Tehran include Veramin, Tafresh, Boroujerd, Khomaine, and Taleghan. Some towns around Isfahan are Najafabad, Josheghan, and the village of Maymeh. There are also a few cities near Kashan that produce fine rugs, such as Ardekan. Kashan and Isfahan are both pioneers in the game of handmade rugs, and the two have had great influence on their surrounding cities. This is why Najafabad carries out the design of Isfahan, and Yazd and Ardekan weave the famous design of Kashan. Most of the time, the rugs woven in Kashan, Yazd, or Ardekan are indistinguishable from one another. A genuine Isfahan rug however can always be identified by an expert. Most of these towns of central Iran have existed for thousands of years and they have built up quite a rich history.

      Yazd Rugs
      Yazd is another ancient city of central Iran, which has been producing amazing rugs for centuries. Although not as old as the city of Kashan, Yazd rugs have a surprisingly close resemblance to the legendary rugs of Kashan. The similarity in design between the two types of rugs is astonishing. Often times, they are mistaken for one another. This is because the two are very close together geographically, and it is safe to say that Yazd has learned a lot more about weaving high quality rugs from Kashan than Kashan has from Yazd. Most of what is said about the rich history of Kashan can be said about the history of Yazd. Much like Kashan rugs, Yazd has been known to produce some fine rugs, which have been auctioned for several hundreds of thousands of dollars. A timeless figure in Iranian history, and true contender in the game of rugs, the people of Yazd have a lot to cherish and celebrate.

      Mood Rugs
      "The Persian province of Khorassan is the biggest province in Iran. It stretches along the northeast of the nation. Many beautiful rugs come from this area of Iran. The capital city is Mashad, which is also where most of these rugs are marketed everyday. Some other rug producing centers in this region are Kashmar (Turshis), Mood, Sabzevar, Ghain, and Birjand, most of which are situated very close to Mashad. Many Baluch type rugs are also woven in this province by Baluchi nomads who inhabit the areas more to the south. In 1722 there was an Afghani Invasion into Iran. This left the country in a state of political confusion for many years, and the rug industry in a state of disorientation, especially in well established areas such as Mashad. However, despite the mass invasion, Khorassan along with many other regions were able to get back on their feet and so the rug industry started up again as the royal courts of Iran did everything in their power to bring this great art back home. Many times, Kings of Iran such as Shah Abass would seize and destroy low quality carpets and those with inferior coloring techniques to make sure the integrity of this ancient Persian art wasn't lost. "

      Qashqai Rugs
      Nomadic tribes in this area, which stretches from the great southern Fars province of Iran through parts of the province of Kerman, have a long history of rug weaving using strong Turkish and Kurdish weaving influences and techniques. The famous Gabbeh is produced in the southern part of this vast province and the Afshar and Qashqai regions are also situated here. The Afshar tribes are within the province of Kerman while the notorious Qashqai tribes are spread across the two provinces and some other parts of southern Iran. Some rug weaving centers include the ancient and historic city of Shiraz which is in Fars, the famous city of Kerman which is in the province of Kerman, and the towns of Abadeh, Sirjan, and many other villages and nomadic colonies spread along these regions. These rugs were not originally made to sell commercially. Rather, people who wove them were following an ancient custom that has been a part of the Iranian heritage for over 3500 years. Younger girls begin weaving early to demonstrate their preparedness for marriage and to offer their handiwork as part of their dowry and it is custom for most women to have this wonderful talent which is rug weaving.

      Sanandaj Rugs
      Kurdish carpets are woven throughout western Iran, in and around the rugged mountainous region of Kurdistan. The Kurds derive from the ancient nomadic peoples that roamed the area thousands of years ago. They live a semi-nomadic life, either in villages or in moving tribes away from the cities, where they can still carry out their old traditions and live as they did thousands of years ago. A few of the Kurdish tribes of the western regions include the Herki, Senjabi, Gurani, Jaffid, and Kalhors. A few major Kurdish rug-producing centers are Senneh, Bidjar, and the district of Khamseh. Some other Kurdish villages and districts that produce rugs are Borchelu, Goltogh, Khoi, Koliai, Lylyan, Mousel, Nanadj, Songhore, Touserkan, and Zagheh. As you can see, the Kurds are well established, and historic semi-nomadic and/or nomadic peoples of Iran who date back thousands of years. Many other major rug producing centers of Iran, such as Hamadan, Lorestan, or even Arak show obvious traces of Kurdish influence. Sometimes they incorporate the style and techniques of the Turkish people of Iran, who are also very widespread. The Kurds are a very peaceful and gentle group who prefer their simple nomadic lives to the complexities and frustrations of the modern technological world.

      Shahsavan Rugs
      This ancient region of Iran is very renowned for rug weaving. It has a rich history that dates back a long time. Here, in these rugged and mountainous conditions, much like many other parts of Iran, almost all the men and women have the talent and skill to weave high quality carpets by hand, with no use of modern technology whatsoever. In some cases, rug weaving is the family's main source of income. They trade the rugs in nearby cities with local merchants for staples and necessities of the home. A few regions and towns that are included in this Turkish region of Iran are Ardabil, Bakhshaish, Gharadjeh (Gharabagh), Goravan, Heriz, Mehriban, Sarab, and Shahsavan. Their weaving style originates partly from Mongols who invaded Iran in the 13th century, and settled the northwest. This historic region of Iran and some parts of Turkey and Uzbekistan have really been significant in the forming of the present day carpet industry. Carpet weaving has long been a custom of theirs and they continue to weave them everyday.

      Tabatabaie Rugs
      "Tabriz is probably the biggest handmade rug-producing center in the world, and most definitely one of the very oldest. Anybody who knows anything about Persian rugs will know something about Tabriz rugs. The enchanted city of Tabriz fully developed more than a thousand years ago. After the many invasions and wars that the nation went through, Tabriz took the lost and ancient ways of the past and created a monster of a rug exporting industry to supply beautiful carpets to the whole world. One of the finest eras of Persian rug weaving was the Saffavid period, which started in 1502 when the Saffavids overthrew the Turks who had captured Tabriz. They made the city into an artful and poetic center of Persian culture. And of course this meant producing fine rugs. Today, many rugs produced in Tabriz are attempting to follow the incredible artistry, which were the Persian Safavid rugs. Tabriz managed to keep these ancient traditions alive, in spite of all the conquering and political restructuring. Today when a big rug retailer somewhere in the world wants a specific pattern woven by hand on a rug, Tabriz is the city that he goes to. Tabriz is truly a magnificent figure in Iranian history and in the handmade carpet industry."

      Touserkan Rugs
      Kurdish carpets are woven throughout western Iran, in and around the rugged mountainous region of Kurdistan. The Kurds derive from the ancient nomadic peoples that roamed the area thousands of years ago. They live a semi-nomadic life, either in villages or in moving tribes away from the cities, where they can still carry out their old traditions and live as they did thousands of years ago. A few of the Kurdish tribes of the western regions include the Herki, Senjabi, Gurani, Jaffid, and Kalhors. A few major Kurdish rug-producing centers are Senneh, Bidjar, and the district of Khamseh. Some other Kurdish villages and districts that produce rugs are Borchelu, Goltogh, Khoi, Koliai, Lylyan, Mousel, Nanadj, Songhore, Touserkan, and Zagheh. As you can see, the Kurds are well established, and historic semi-nomadic and/or nomadic peoples of Iran who date back thousands of years. Many other major rug producing centers of Iran, such as Hamadan, Lorestan, or even Arak show obvious traces of Kurdish influence. Sometimes they incorporate the style and techniques of the Turkish people of Iran, who are also very widespread. The Kurds are a very peaceful and gentle group who prefer their simple nomadic lives to the complexities and frustrations of the modern technological world.

      Zagheh Rugs
      Kurdish rugs, like all other Persian rugs are all 100% handmade. They are made of pure wool which is spun from the weaver's own sheep. In very rare cases you might find a carpet that has silk in the pile, and you will often see the foundation of Kurdish rugs being made of goat hair. The pile however, is always wool. The weaving quality in Kurdish rugs varies from loose to dense knotting and the Persian asymmetrical knot is used more than the Turkish symmetrical knot. The colors are attained mainly from natural vegetable dyes. The color schemes of most Kurdish rugs are bright and vibrant. Unlike most people in the western world who like faded and muted colors, the Kurds love bright lively colors. These exciting rugs bring life to these simple people's dull homes. All Kurdish rugs are rugged and long lasting as they have proved to be for thousands of years.

      Nahavand Rugs
      Hamedan is an ancient Persian city (the second oldest city of Iran), which lies at about 6500 feet above sea level in the rugged mountainous region of northwestern Iran. It has a rich history, which dates back many centuries. The city itself, along with the countless villages and districts surrounding it, produces a good portion of the tribal rugs of Iran. Some areas around Hamedan include Chenar, Derjazin, Hussainabad, Nahavand, and the Kurdish districts of Khamseh, and many others, that are between Arak and Hamedan. All the rugs produced in the surrounding area of Hamedan are marketed inside of the city. There can be seen obvious traces of Kurdish and some Turkish influence on the people of the province of Hamedan, which is just east of Kurdistan. The peaceful people of the province of Hamedan have managed for several centuries, despite all the greedy foreign invasions, to keep their precious talent of rug weaving alive.

      Qum Rugs
      The city of Qum is considered a holy place among Iranians, where many of whom travel to for inner peace with God. The Qum doesn't have a distinct pattern so it produces a variety of beautiful rugs, with numerous exiting designs. Frequently, ancient and established designs of historic carpets are reproduced in Qum. Today, Qum has one of the most modern rug weaving industries in all of Asia.

      Shiraz Rugs
      Nomadic tribes in this area, which stretches from the great southern Fars province of Iran through parts of the province of Kerman, have a long history of rug weaving using strong Turkish and Kurdish weaving influences and techniques. The famous Gabbeh is produced in the southern part of this vast province and the Afshar and Qashqai regions are also situated here. The Afshar tribes are within the province of Kerman while the notorious Qashqai tribes are spread across the two provinces and some other parts of southern Iran. Some rug weaving centers include the ancient and historic city of Shiraz which is in Fars, the famous city of Kerman which is in the province of Kerman, and the towns of Abadeh, Sirjan, and many other villages and nomadic colonies spread along these regions. These rugs were not originally made to sell commercially. Rather, people who wove them were following an ancient custom that has been a part of the Iranian heritage for over 3500 years. Younger girls begin weaving early to demonstrate their preparedness for marriage and to offer their handiwork as part of their dowry and it is custom for most women to have this wonderful talent which is rug weaving.

      Tabriz Rugs
      "Tabriz is probably the biggest handmade rug-producing center in the world, and most definitely one of the very oldest. Anybody who knows anything about Persian rugs will know something about Tabriz rugs. The enchanted city of Tabriz fully developed more than a thousand years ago. After the many invasions and wars that the nation went through, Tabriz took the lost and ancient ways of the past and created a monster of a rug exporting industry to supply beautiful carpets to the whole world. One of the finest eras of Persian rug weaving was the Saffavid period, which started in 1502 when the Saffavids overthrew the Turks who had captured Tabriz. They made the city into an artful and poetic center of Persian culture. And of course this meant producing fine rugs. Today, many rugs produced in Tabriz are attempting to follow the incredible artistry, which were the Persian Safavid rugs. Tabriz managed to keep these ancient traditions alive, in spite of all the conquering and political restructuring. Today when a big rug retailer somewhere in the world wants a specific pattern woven by hand on a rug, Tabriz is the city that he goes to. Tabriz is truly a magnificent figure in Iranian history and in the handmade carpet industry."

      Turkoman Rugs
      This ancient region of Iran is very renowned for rug weaving. It has a rich history that dates back a long time. Here, in these rugged and mountainous conditions, much like many other parts of Iran, almost all the men and women have the talent and skill to weave high quality carpets by hand, with no use of modern technology whatsoever. In some cases, rug weaving is the family's main source of income. They trade the rugs in nearby cities with local merchants for staples and necessities of the home. A few regions and towns that are included in this Turkish region of Iran are Ardabil, Bakhshaish, Gharadjeh (Gharabagh), Goravan, Heriz, Mehriban, Sarab, and Shahsavan. Their weaving style originates partly from Mongols who invaded Iran in the 13th century, and settled the northwest. This historic region of Iran and some parts of Turkey and Uzbekistan have really been significant in the forming of the present day carpet industry. Carpet weaving has long been a custom of theirs and they continue to weave them everyday.

      Zanjan Rugs
      The northern part of Iran, including the provinces of Gilan, Zanjan, and Mazandaran is very rich in history. There are some strong traces of Turkish and Kurdish influence seen in these nomadic and/or semi-nomadic people, but they are mostly of Persian origin. Turkish and Mogul tribes who are descendants of the Mongolians (led by Chengis Khan) who invaded the country in the 13th century have been living in this region for many centuries. The province of Zanjan has a higher Kurdish population and Gilan has a higher Persian nomadic population. These peaceful people are documented to have been weaving rugs for over 3000 years. They have a migratory lifestyle and almost all the women, along with most of the men, have the incredible talent of rug weaving. In some cases, the rug weaving is the family's main source of income. These provinces of Iran continued to weave rugs even in the harshest conditions and they kept this truly magnificent art alive as much as they could.

      Nain Rugs
      Although Nain is not a very old rug-weaving city, it is well established and among the most valued carpet producing centers in Iran. It has adapted most of its skills from the very ancient and neighboring city of Isfahan, which also produces a very exquisite rug. Customs and traditions here have changed very little in the past century. For many generations, the people of Nain produced a superior quality of handmade woolen cloth used to make traditional religious and secular garments and fine wool cloaks until just prior to WWII in the 1930s. After the war, Iranians began to adopt western clothing styles and the market for the fabrics produced in Nain dwindled. Thus the highly developed knowledge and skills of Nain's fabric industry were transferred over to the making of handmade carpets. Nain's reputation for the finest quality weaving was once again established in modern times.

      Sarough Rugs
      A very important rug-producing district in Iran, Arak (formerly known as Sultanabad) and its surrounding area, is located in the Central Northwestern part of Iran, east of the province of Hamedan, south of the province of Zanjan, and north of the province of Lorestan in the province of Markad. Arak, along with its many neighboring villages, produces countless quantities of handmade Persian rugs every year. The finished carpets are usually marketed in the town itself. Some major areas around Arak are known as the Mahallat, Ferahan, and Lylyan. Some neighboring towns and villages are: Malayer, Meshkabad, Mirabad, Seraband, Sarough, Jozan, along with many other small Kurdish villages and settlements. There has been strong Kurdish influences on these people's style of weaving, and some traces of Turkish ancestry can also be seen. Arak is where The Manchester Firm of Ziegler's opened an office in 1883. Originally an importer of English goods, the firm soon realized the financial advantages of starting a carpet factory in this region to produce rugs to be marketed in Europe and the USA. It has been estimated that by the turn of the century, Ziegler controlled over 2500 looms at work in this district. The Mahallat produces a very high quality rug known as Mahal, and Sarough is also famous for producing exquisite pieces. Lylyans tend to look more tribal as do many rugs made in these surrounding villages. Ferahans are very recognized world over as a result of their high quality weave and rich history, and Serabands are very similar to Ferahans. Mirabad also produces a very high quality carpet, usually with an overall design, known as the Mir. All the rugs of this area are completely unique and one of a kind, but a striking resemblance can be seen within some of them. This entire area is very important and precious to the Persian rug community, and deserves the respect that it gets.

      Sirjan Rugs
      Nomadic tribes in this area, which stretches from the great southern Fars province of Iran through parts of the province of Kerman, have a long history of rug weaving using strong Turkish and Kurdish weaving influences and techniques. The famous Gabbeh is produced in the southern part of this vast province and the Afshar and Qashqai regions are also situated here. The Afshar tribes are within the province of Kerman while the notorious Qashqai tribes are spread across the two provinces and some other parts of southern Iran. Some rug weaving centers include the ancient and historic city of Shiraz which is in Fars, the famous city of Kerman which is in the province of Kerman, and the towns of Abadeh, Sirjan, and many other villages and nomadic colonies spread along these regions. These rugs were not originally made to sell commercially. Rather, people who wove them were following an ancient custom that has been a part of the Iranian heritage for over 3500 years. Younger girls begin weaving early to demonstrate their preparedness for marriage and to offer their handiwork as part of their dowry and it is custom for most women to have this wonderful talent which is rug weaving.

      Tafresh Rugs
      Besides the legendary cities of Central Iran such as Tehran, Isfahan, Qum, Nain, Kashan, Yazd, and Kerman that weave amazing quality rugs, there are numerous smaller towns scattered throughout central Iran that weave very high quality carpets as well. Although not as fine as the eminent city rugs, these handmade rugs are still among the highest of quality in the world. Some of these small towns south of Tehran include Veramin, Tafresh, Boroujerd, Khomaine, and Taleghan. Some towns around Isfahan are Najafabad, Josheghan, and the village of Maymeh. There are also a few cities near Kashan that produce fine rugs, such as Ardekan. Kashan and Isfahan are both pioneers in the game of handmade rugs, and the two have had great influence on their surrounding cities. This is why Najafabad carries out the design of Isfahan, and Yazd and Ardekan weave the famous design of Kashan. Most of the time, the rugs woven in Kashan, Yazd, or Ardekan are indistinguishable from one another. A genuine Isfahan rug however can always be identified by an expert. Most of these towns of central Iran have existed for thousands of years and they have built up quite a rich history.

      Abadeh Rugs
      Nomadic tribes in this area, which stretches from the great southern Fars province of Iran through parts of the province of Kerman, have a long history of rug weaving using strong Turkish and Kurdish weaving influences and techniques. The famous Gabbeh is produced in the southern part of this vast province and the Afshar and Qashqai regions are also situated here. The Afshar tribes are within the province of Kerman while the notorious Qashqai tribes are spread across the two provinces and some other parts of southern Iran. Some rug weaving centers include the ancient and historic city of Shiraz which is in Fars, the famous city of Kerman which is in the province of Kerman, and the towns of Abadeh, Sirjan, and many other villages and nomadic colonies spread along these regions. These rugs were not originally made to sell commercially. Rather, people who wove them were following an ancient custom that has been a part of the Iranian heritage for over 3500 years. Younger girls begin weaving early to demonstrate their preparedness for marriage and to offer their handiwork as part of their dowry and it is custom for most women to have this wonderful talent which is rug weaving.

      Arak Rugs
      A very important rug-producing district in Iran, Arak (formerly known as Sultanabad) and its surrounding area, is located in the Central Northwestern part of Iran, east of the province of Hamedan, south of the province of Zanjan, and north of the province of Lorestan in the province of Markad. Arak, along with its many neighboring villages, produces countless quantities of handmade Persian rugs every year. The finished carpets are usually marketed in the town itself. Some major areas around Arak are known as the Mahallat, Ferahan, and Lylyan. Some neighboring towns and villages are: Malayer, Meshkabad, Mirabad, Seraband, Sarough, Jozan, along with many other small Kurdish villages and settlements. There has been strong Kurdish influences on these people's style of weaving, and some traces of Turkish ancestry can also be seen. Arak is where The Manchester Firm of Ziegler's opened an office in 1883. Originally an importer of English goods, the firm soon realized the financial advantages of starting a carpet factory in this region to produce rugs to be marketed in Europe and the USA. It has been estimated that by the turn of the century, Ziegler controlled over 2500 looms at work in this district. The Mahallat produces a very high quality rug known as Mahal, and Sarough is also famous for producing exquisite pieces. Lylyans tend to look more tribal as do many rugs made in these surrounding villages. Ferahans are very recognized world over as a result of their high quality weave and rich history, and Serabands are very similar to Ferahans. Mirabad also produces a very high quality carpet, usually with an overall design, known as the Mir. All the rugs of this area are completely unique and one of a kind, but a striking resemblance can be seen within some of them. This entire area is very important and precious to the Persian rug community, and deserves the respect that it gets.

      Bidjar Rugs
      Kurdish carpets are woven throughout western Iran, in and around the rugged mountainous region of Kurdistan. The Kurds derive from the ancient nomadic peoples that roamed the area thousands of years ago. They live a semi-nomadic life, either in villages or in moving tribes away from the cities, where they can still carry out their old traditions and live as they did thousands of years ago. A few of the Kurdish tribes of the western regions include the Herki, Senjabi, Gurani, Jaffid, and Kalhors. A few major Kurdish rug-producing centers are Senneh, Bidjar, and the district of Khamseh. Some other Kurdish villages and districts that produce rugs are Borchelu, Goltogh, Khoi, Koliai, Lylyan, Mousel, Nanadj, Songhore, Touserkan, and Zagheh. As you can see, the Kurds are well established, and historic semi-nomadic and/or nomadic peoples of Iran who date back thousands of years. Many other major rug producing centers of Iran, such as Hamadan, Lorestan, or even Arak show obvious traces of Kurdish influence. Sometimes they incorporate the style and techniques of the Turkish people of Iran, who are also very widespread. The Kurds are a very peaceful and gentle group who prefer their simple nomadic lives to the complexities and frustrations of the modern technological world.

      Chenar Rugs
      Hamedan is an ancient Persian city (the second oldest city of Iran), which lies at about 6500 feet above sea level in the rugged mountainous region of northwestern Iran. It has a rich history, which dates back many centuries. The city itself, along with the countless villages and districts surrounding it, produces a good portion of the tribal rugs of Iran. Some areas around Hamedan include Chenar, Derjazin, Hussainabad, Nahavand, and the Kurdish districts of Khamseh, and many others, that are between Arak and Hamedan. All the rugs produced in the surrounding area of Hamedan are marketed inside of the city. There can be seen obvious traces of Kurdish and some Turkish influence on the people of the province of Hamedan, which is just east of Kurdistan. The peaceful people of the province of Hamedan have managed for several centuries, despite all the greedy foreign invasions, to keep their precious talent of rug weaving alive.

      Gharadjeh Rugs
      This ancient region of Iran is very renowned for rug weaving. It has a rich history that dates back a long time. Here, in these rugged and mountainous conditions, much like many other parts of Iran, almost all the men and women have the talent and skill to weave high quality carpets by hand, with no use of modern technology whatsoever. In some cases, rug weaving is the family's main source of income. They trade the rugs in nearby cities with local merchants for staples and necessities of the home. A few regions and towns that are included in this Turkish region of Iran are Ardabil, Bakhshaish, Gharadjeh (Gharabagh), Goravan, Heriz, Mehriban, Sarab, and Shahsavan. Their weaving style originates partly from Mongols who invaded Iran in the 13th century, and settled the northwest. This historic region of Iran and some parts of Turkey and Uzbekistan have really been significant in the forming of the present day carpet industry. Carpet weaving has long been a custom of theirs and they continue to weave them everyday.

      Hamadan Rugs
      Hamedan is an ancient Persian city (the second oldest city of Iran), which lies at about 6500 feet above sea level in the rugged mountainous region of northwestern Iran. It has a rich history, which dates back many centuries. The city itself, along with the countless villages and districts surrounding it, produces a good portion of the tribal rugs of Iran. Some areas around Hamedan include Chenar, Derjazin, Hussainabad, Nahavand, and the Kurdish districts of Khamseh, and many others, that are between Arak and Hamedan. All the rugs produced in the surrounding area of Hamedan are marketed inside of the city. There can be seen obvious traces of Kurdish and some Turkish influence on the people of the province of Hamedan, which is just east of Kurdistan. The peaceful people of the province of Hamedan have managed for several centuries, despite all the greedy foreign invasions, to keep their precious talent of rug weaving alive.

      Isfahan Rugs
      Isfahan experienced its 'Golden Age' in the seventeenth century when Shah Abbas, who was the king of Iran at that time, declared it the nation's capital. The finest carpets in the world were produced here during this exalted period. It is safe to say that Isfahan still produces the world's finest rug. The ancient Persian kings always had these rugs placed throughout their palaces; on the floors, and sometimes placed on the walls like priceless paintings. Isfahan itself is a very historic city, and it is responsible for a great portion of the reputation that the Persian rug name has today.

      Kerman Rugs
      Kerman is an ancient Persian city that is renowned worldwide for its amazing carpets. It has an incredible history dating back to well over a thousand years ago. Much like many other major rug producing centers in Iran, Kerman's rug weaving industry has lost a lot of its integrity over the past century and went downhill. This is largely due to high levels of greed and corruption. Although Kerman"s rugs today aren"t nearly as fine as they were a hundred or more years ago, they have managed to keep one of the highest reputations of Iran's rugs. Kerman is a city of tropical climate, and can get very hot in summer. It is located in the central southeastern section of Iran in the province that bears its name. Many books have been written about the rich history of this city, and the carpet industry is just one of its treasures.

      Lori Rugs
      Kurdish carpets are woven throughout western Iran, in and around the rugged mountainous region of Kurdistan. The Kurds derive from the ancient nomadic peoples that roamed the area thousands of years ago. They live a semi-nomadic life, either in villages or in moving tribes away from the cities, where they can still carry out their old traditions and live as they did thousands of years ago. A few of the Kurdish tribes of the western regions include the Herki, Senjabi, Gurani, Jaffid, and Kalhors. A few major Kurdish rug-producing centers are Senneh, Bidjar, and the district of Khamseh. Some other Kurdish villages and districts that produce rugs are Borchelu, Goltogh, Khoi, Koliai, Lylyan, Mousel, Nanadj, Songhore, Touserkan, and Zagheh. As you can see, the Kurds are well established, and historic semi-nomadic and/or nomadic peoples of Iran who date back thousands of years. Many other major rug producing centers of Iran, such as Hamadan, Lorestan, or even Arak show obvious traces of Kurdish influence. Sometimes they incorporate the style and techniques of the Turkish people of Iran, who are also very widespread. The Kurds are a very peaceful and gentle group who prefer their simple nomadic lives to the complexities and frustrations of the modern technological world.

      Malayer Rugs
      A very important rug-producing district in Iran, Arak (formerly known as Sultanabad) and its surrounding area, is located in the Central Northwestern part of Iran, east of the province of Hamedan, south of the province of Zanjan, and north of the province of Lorestan in the province of Markad. Arak, along with its many neighboring villages, produces countless quantities of handmade Persian rugs every year. The finished carpets are usually marketed in the town itself. Some major areas around Arak are known as the Mahallat, Ferahan, and Lylyan. Some neighboring towns and villages are: Malayer, Meshkabad, Mirabad, Seraband, Sarough, Jozan, along with many other small Kurdish villages and settlements. There has been strong Kurdish influences on these people's style of weaving, and some traces of Turkish ancestry can also be seen. Arak is where The Manchester Firm of Ziegler's opened an office in 1883. Originally an importer of English goods, the firm soon realized the financial advantages of starting a carpet factory in this region to produce rugs to be marketed in Europe and the USA. It has been estimated that by the turn of the century, Ziegler controlled over 2500 looms at work in this district. The Mahallat produces a very high quality rug known as Mahal, and Sarough is also famous for producing exquisite pieces. Lylyans tend to look more tribal as do many rugs made in these surrounding villages. Ferahans are very recognized world over as a result of their high quality weave and rich history, and Serabands are very similar to Ferahans. Mirabad also produces a very high quality carpet, usually with an overall design, known as the Mir. All the rugs of this area are completely unique and one of a kind, but a striking resemblance can be seen within some of them. This entire area is very important and precious to the Persian rug community, and deserves the respect that it gets.

      Ardabil Rugs
      This ancient region of Iran is very renowned for rug weaving. It has a rich history that dates back a long time. Here, in these rugged and mountainous conditions, much like many other parts of Iran, almost all the men and women have the talent and skill to weave high quality carpets by hand, with no use of modern technology whatsoever. In some cases, rug weaving is the family's main source of income. They trade the rugs in nearby cities with local merchants for staples and necessities of the home. A few regions and towns that are included in this Turkish region of Iran are Ardabil, Bakhshaish, Gharadjeh (Gharabagh), Goravan, Heriz, Mehriban, Sarab, and Shahsavan. Their weaving style originates partly from Mongols who invaded Iran in the 13th century, and settled the northwest. This historic region of Iran and some parts of Turkey and Uzbekistan have really been significant in the forming of the present day carpet industry. Carpet weaving has long been a custom of theirs and they continue to weave them everyday.

      Birjand Rugs
      "The Persian province of Khorassan is the biggest province in Iran. It stretches along the northeast of the nation. Many beautiful rugs come from this area of Iran. The capital city is Mashad, which is also where most of these rugs are marketed everyday. Some other rug producing centers in this region are Kashmar (Turshis), Mood, Sabzevar, Ghain, and Birjand, most of which are situated very close to Mashad. Many Baluch type rugs are also woven in this province by Baluchi nomads who inhabit the areas more to the south. In 1722 there was an Afghani Invasion into Iran. This left the country in a state of political confusion for many years, and the rug industry in a state of disorientation, especially in well established areas such as Mashad. However, despite the mass invasion, Khorassan along with many other regions were able to get back on their feet and so the rug industry started up again as the royal courts of Iran did everything in their power to bring this great art back home. Many times, Kings of Iran such as Shah Abass would seize and destroy low quality carpets and those with inferior coloring techniques to make sure the integrity of this ancient Persian art wasn't lost. "

      Ferahan Rugs
      Kurdish carpets are woven throughout western Iran, in and around the rugged mountainous region of Kurdistan. The Kurds derive from the ancient nomadic peoples that roamed the area thousands of years ago. They live a semi-nomadic life, either in villages or in moving tribes away from the cities, where they can still carry out their old traditions and live as they did thousands of years ago. A few of the Kurdish tribes of the western regions include the Herki, Senjabi, Gurani, Jaffid, and Kalhors. A few major Kurdish rug-producing centers are Senneh, Bidjar, and the district of Khamseh. Some other Kurdish villages and districts that produce rugs are Borchelu, Goltogh, Khoi, Koliai, Lylyan, Mousel, Nanadj, Songhore, Touserkan, and Zagheh. As you can see, the Kurds are well established, and historic semi-nomadic and/or nomadic peoples of Iran who date back thousands of years. Many other major rug producing centers of Iran, such as Hamadan, Lorestan, or even Arak show obvious traces of Kurdish influence. Sometimes they incorporate the style and techniques of the Turkish people of Iran, who are also very widespread. The Kurds are a very peaceful and gentle group who prefer their simple nomadic lives to the complexities and frustrations of the modern technological world.

      Ghoochan Rugs
      "The Persian province of Khorassan is the biggest province in Iran. It stretches along the northeast of the nation. Many beautiful rugs come from this area of Iran. The capital city is Mashad, which is also where most of these rugs are marketed everyday. Some other rug producing centers in this region are Kashmar (Turshis), Mood, Sabzevar, Ghain, and Birjand, most of which are situated very close to Mashad. Many Baluch type rugs are also woven in this province by Baluchi nomads who inhabit the areas more to the south. In 1722 there was an Afghani Invasion into Iran. This left the country in a state of political confusion for many years, and the rug industry in a state of disorientation, especially in well established areas such as Mashad. However, despite the mass invasion, Khorassan along with many other regions were able to get back on their feet and so the rug industry started up again as the royal courts of Iran did everything in their power to bring this great art back home. Many times, Kings of Iran such as Shah Abass would seize and destroy low quality carpets and those with inferior coloring techniques to make sure the integrity of this ancient Persian art wasn't lost. "

      Hashtrood Rugs
      The northern part of Iran, including the provinces of Gilan, Zanjan, and Mazandaran is very rich in history. There are some strong traces of Turkish and Kurdish influence seen in these nomadic and/or semi-nomadic people, but they are mostly of Persian origin. Turkish and Mogul tribes who are descendants of the Mongolians (led by Chengis Khan) who invaded the country in the 13th century have been living in this region for many centuries. The province of Zanjan has a higher Kurdish population and Gilan has a higher Persian nomadic population. These peaceful people are documented to have been weaving rugs for over 3000 years. They have a migratory lifestyle and almost all the women, along with most of the men, have the incredible talent of rug weaving. In some cases, the rug weaving is the family's main source of income. These provinces of Iran continued to weave rugs even in the harshest conditions and they kept this truly magnificent art alive as much as they could.

      Kashan Rugs
      Kashan is an ancient Persian city that is renowned worldwide for its amazing carpets. There is a strong and cherished history that all Kashans have. Kings and royal monarchies from around the world would personally come to Iran over the centuries to purchase rugs from Kashan. The rugs from this fabled city are so respected in Iran that the Kashan name alone sells them. People know they are getting the best when they buy a fine Kashan. Although today the finest rugs of Iran don"t usually come out of Kashan, many centuries ago it produced perhaps some of the finest carpets in the world. Some older Kashans from the 16th or 17th century are in museums priced at several hundred thousand, to millions of dollars. Kashan had a well-established silk rug industry as early as the 17th century and their patterns haven"t changed much since. By the end of the Second World War, it was estimated that the city of Kashan could operate 12000 professional looms simultaneously. A true champion in the game, Kashan managed to stay on top of the game for many centuries, producing countless numbers of gorgeous rugs that made mansions beautiful around the world.

      Lylyan Rugs
      Kurdish carpets are woven throughout western Iran, in and around the rugged mountainous region of Kurdistan. The Kurds derive from the ancient nomadic peoples that roamed the area thousands of years ago. They live a semi-nomadic life, either in villages or in moving tribes away from the cities, where they can still carry out their old traditions and live as they did thousands of years ago. A few of the Kurdish tribes of the western regions include the Herki, Senjabi, Gurani, Jaffid, and Kalhors. A few major Kurdish rug-producing centers are Senneh, Bidjar, and the district of Khamseh. Some other Kurdish villages and districts that produce rugs are Borchelu, Goltogh, Khoi, Koliai, Lylyan, Mousel, Nanadj, Songhore, Touserkan, and Zagheh. As you can see, the Kurds are well established, and historic semi-nomadic and/or nomadic peoples of Iran who date back thousands of years. Many other major rug producing centers of Iran, such as Hamadan, Lorestan, or even Arak show obvious traces of Kurdish influence. Sometimes they incorporate the style and techniques of the Turkish people of Iran, who are also very widespread. The Kurds are a very peaceful and gentle group who prefer their simple nomadic lives to the complexities and frustrations of the modern technological world.

      Mashad Rugs
      "The Persian province of Khorassan is the biggest province in Iran. It stretches along the northeast of the nation. Many beautiful rugs come from this area of Iran. The capital city is Mashad, which is also where most of these rugs are marketed everyday. Some other rug producing centers in this region are Kashmar (Turshis), Mood, Sabzevar, Ghain, and Birjand, most of which are situated very close to Mashad. Many Baluch type rugs are also woven in this province by Baluchi nomads who inhabit the areas more to the south. In 1722 there was an Afghani Invasion into Iran. This left the country in a state of political confusion for many years, and the rug industry in a state of disorientation, especially in well established areas such as Mashad. However, despite the mass invasion, Khorassan along with many other regions were able to get back on their feet and so the rug industry started up again as the royal courts of Iran did everything in their power to bring this great art back home. Many times, Kings of Iran such as Shah Abass would seize and destroy low quality carpets and those with inferior coloring techniques to make sure the integrity of this ancient Persian art wasn't lost. "

      Borchelu Rugs
      Kurdish carpets are woven throughout western Iran, in and around the rugged mountainous region of Kurdistan. The Kurds derive from the ancient nomadic peoples that roamed the area thousands of years ago. They live a semi-nomadic life, either in villages or in moving tribes away from the cities, where they can still carry out their old traditions and live as they did thousands of years ago. A few of the Kurdish tribes of the western regions include the Herki, Senjabi, Gurani, Jaffid, and Kalhors. A few major Kurdish rug-producing centers are Senneh, Bidjar, and the district of Khamseh. Some other Kurdish villages and districts that produce rugs are Borchelu, Goltogh, Khoi, Koliai, Lylyan, Mousel, Nanadj, Songhore, Touserkan, and Zagheh. As you can see, the Kurds are well established, and historic semi-nomadic and/or nomadic peoples of Iran who date back thousands of years. Many other major rug producing centers of Iran, such as Hamadan, Lorestan, or even Arak show obvious traces of Kurdish influence. Sometimes they incorporate the style and techniques of the Turkish people of Iran, who are also very widespread. The Kurds are a very peaceful and gentle group who prefer their simple nomadic lives to the complexities and frustrations of the modern technological world.

      Bakhtiari Rugs
      During the period of the great Khans, whose wealth and position built many mansions and palaces throughout the Charan Mahal valley of Iran during the eighteenth century, lush and sumptuous gardens which this rug represents, and enclosed courtyards were a symbol of pride and status. These rich merchants also established some of the highest quality rug weaving centers in all of Persia. In the latter part of the nineteenth century, descendents of the early Khans' became rich when oil was found and exploited on their lands. They spared no expense in providing the very best materials to produce their rugs. While much of that wealth has long since disappeared or shifted away from the sector in modern times, the design motifs and quality of the Bahktiari rug have been carefully preserved.

      Afshar Rugs
      Nomadic tribes in this area, which stretches from the great southern Fars province of Iran through parts of the province of Kerman, have a long history of rug weaving using strong Turkish and Kurdish weaving influences and techniques. The famous Gabbeh is produced in the southern part of this vast province and the Afshar and Qashqai regions are also situated here. The Afshar tribes are within the province of Kerman while the notorious Qashqai tribes are spread across the two provinces and some other parts of southern Iran. Some rug weaving centers include the ancient and historic city of Shiraz which is in Fars, the famous city of Kerman which is in the province of Kerman, and the towns of Abadeh, Sirjan, and many other villages and nomadic colonies spread along these regions. These rugs were not originally made to sell commercially. Rather, people who wove them were following an ancient custom that has been a part of the Iranian heritage for over 3500 years. Younger girls begin weaving early to demonstrate their preparedness for marriage and to offer their handiwork as part of their dowry and it is custom for most women to have this wonderful talent which is rug weaving.

      Ferdos Rugs
      "The Persian province of Khorassan is the biggest province in Iran. It stretches along the northeast of the nation. Many beautiful rugs come from this area of Iran. The capital city is Mashad, which is also where most of these rugs are marketed everyday. Some other rug producing centers in this region are Kashmar (Turshis), Mood, Sabzevar, Ghain, and Birjand, most of which are situated very close to Mashad. Many Baluch type rugs are also woven in this province by Baluchi nomads who inhabit the areas more to the south. In 1722 there was an Afghani Invasion into Iran. This left the country in a state of political confusion for many years, and the rug industry in a state of disorientation, especially in well established areas such as Mashad. However, despite the mass invasion, Khorassan along with many other regions were able to get back on their feet and so the rug industry started up again as the royal courts of Iran did everything in their power to bring this great art back home. Many times, Kings of Iran such as Shah Abass would seize and destroy low quality carpets and those with inferior coloring techniques to make sure the integrity of this ancient Persian art wasn't lost. "

      Goltogh Rugs
      Kurdish carpets are woven throughout western Iran, in and around the rugged mountainous region of Kurdistan. The Kurds derive from the ancient nomadic peoples that roamed the area thousands of years ago. They live a semi-nomadic life, either in villages or in moving tribes away from the cities, where they can still carry out their old traditions and live as they did thousands of years ago. A few of the Kurdish tribes of the western regions include the Herki, Senjabi, Gurani, Jaffid, and Kalhors. A few major Kurdish rug-producing centers are Senneh, Bidjar, and the district of Khamseh. Some other Kurdish villages and districts that produce rugs are Borchelu, Goltogh, Khoi, Koliai, Lylyan, Mousel, Nanadj, Songhore, Touserkan, and Zagheh. As you can see, the Kurds are well established, and historic semi-nomadic and/or nomadic peoples of Iran who date back thousands of years. Many other major rug producing centers of Iran, such as Hamadan, Lorestan, or even Arak show obvious traces of Kurdish influence. Sometimes they incorporate the style and techniques of the Turkish people of Iran, who are also very widespread. The Kurds are a very peaceful and gentle group who prefer their simple nomadic lives to the complexities and frustrations of the modern technological world.

      Heriz Rugs
      This ancient region of Iran is very renowned for rug weaving. It has a rich history that dates back a long time. Here, in these rugged and mountainous conditions, much like many other parts of Iran, almost all the men and women have the talent and skill to weave high quality carpets by hand, with no use of modern technology whatsoever. In some cases, rug weaving is the family's main source of income. They trade the rugs in nearby cities with local merchants for staples and necessities of the home. A few regions and towns that are included in this Turkish region of Iran are Ardabil, Bakhshaish, Gharadjeh (Gharabagh), Goravan, Heriz, Mehriban, Sarab, and Shahsavan. Their weaving style originates partly from Mongols who invaded Iran in the 13th century, and settled the northwest. This historic region of Iran and some parts of Turkey and Uzbekistan have really been significant in the forming of the present day carpet industry. Carpet weaving has long been a custom of theirs and they continue to weave them everyday.

      Kashmar Rugs
      "The Persian province of Khorassan is the biggest province in Iran. It stretches along the northeast of the nation. Many beautiful rugs come from this area of Iran. The capital city is Mashad, which is also where most of these rugs are marketed everyday. Some other rug producing centers in this region are Kashmar (Turshis), Mood, Sabzevar, Ghain, and Birjand, most of which are situated very close to Mashad. Many Baluch type rugs are also woven in this province by Baluchi nomads who inhabit the areas more to the south. In 1722 there was an Afghani Invasion into Iran. This left the country in a state of political confusion for many years, and the rug industry in a state of disorientation, especially in well established areas such as Mashad. However, despite the mass invasion, Khorassan along with many other regions were able to get back on their feet and so the rug industry started up again as the royal courts of Iran did everything in their power to bring this great art back home. Many times, Kings of Iran such as Shah Abass would seize and destroy low quality carpets and those with inferior coloring techniques to make sure the integrity of this ancient Persian art wasn't lost. "

      Khamseh Rugs
      Kurdish carpets are woven throughout western Iran, in and around the rugged mountainous region of Kurdistan. The Kurds derive from the ancient nomadic peoples that roamed the area thousands of years ago. They live a semi-nomadic life, either in villages or in moving tribes away from the cities, where they can still carry out their old traditions and live as they did thousands of years ago. A few of the Kurdish tribes of the western regions include the Herki, Senjabi, Gurani, Jaffid, and Kalhors. A few major Kurdish rug-producing centers are Senneh, Bidjar, and the district of Khamseh. Some other Kurdish villages and districts that produce rugs are Borchelu, Goltogh, Khoi, Koliai, Lylyan, Mousel, Nanadj, Songhore, Touserkan, and Zagheh. As you can see, the Kurds are well established, and historic semi-nomadic and/or nomadic peoples of Iran who date back thousands of years. Many other major rug producing centers of Iran, such as Hamadan, Lorestan, or even Arak show obvious traces of Kurdish influence. Sometimes they incorporate the style and techniques of the Turkish people of Iran, who are also very widespread. The Kurds are a very peaceful and gentle group who prefer their simple nomadic lives to the complexities and frustrations of the modern technological world.

      Mahabad Rugs
      This ancient region of Iran is very renowned for rug weaving. It has a rich history that dates back a long time. Here, in these rugged and mountainous conditions, much like many other parts of Iran, almost all the men and women have the talent and skill to weave high quality carpets by hand, with no use of modern technology whatsoever. In some cases, rug weaving is the family's main source of income. They trade the rugs in nearby cities with local merchants for staples and necessities of the home. A few regions and towns that are included in this Turkish region of Iran are Ardabil, Bakhshaish, Gharadjeh (Gharabagh), Goravan, Heriz, Mehriban, Sarab, and Shahsavan. Their weaving style originates partly from Mongols who invaded Iran in the 13th century, and settled the northwest. This historic region of Iran and some parts of Turkey and Uzbekistan have really been significant in the forming of the present day carpet industry. Carpet weaving has long been a custom of theirs and they continue to weave them everyday.

      Maymeh Rugs
      Besides the legendary cities of Central Iran such as Tehran, Isfahan, Qum, Nain, Kashan, Yazd, and Kerman that weave amazing quality rugs, there are numerous smaller towns scattered throughout central Iran that weave very high quality carpets as well. Although not as fine as the eminent city rugs, these handmade rugs are still among the highest of quality in the world. Some of these small towns south of Tehran include Veramin, Tafresh, Boroujerd, Khomaine, and Taleghan. Some towns around Isfahan are Najafabad, Josheghan, and the village of Maymeh. There are also a few cities near Kashan that produce fine rugs, such as Ardekan. Kashan and Isfahan are both pioneers in the game of handmade rugs, and the two have had great influence on their surrounding cities. This is why Najafabad carries out the design of Isfahan, and Yazd and Ardekan weave the famous design of Kashan. Most of the time, the rugs woven in Kashan, Yazd, or Ardekan are indistinguishable from one another. A genuine Isfahan rug however can always be identified by an expert. Most of these towns of central Iran have existed for thousands of years and they have built up quite a rich history.

      Baluch Rugs
      The province of Baluchistan, borders to the east and south of the Iranian city of Kerman in the province of Kerman. Here Baluch tribes live in black tents and live nomadically much as they did a hundred or more years ago, relatively isolated from commerce, technology and the conveniences of the modern world. Baluchistan has remains of an ancient city (Burnt City) which has beed dated back to 2000 B.C. The rugs they meticulously weave by hand, often taking many months to complete, have practical uses in the household or are preserved as items of value to be traded during harsh times in the future for basic essentials. The Baluch people's migratory lifestyle is largely unaffected by civilization and these simple people are unaware of the commercial markets around the world into which their charming artifacts are ultimately absorbed and prized as art.

      Boroujerd Rugs
      Besides the legendary cities of Central Iran such as Tehran, Isfahan, Qum, Nain, Kashan, Yazd, and Kerman that weave amazing quality rugs, there are numerous smaller towns scattered throughout central Iran that weave very high quality carpets as well. Although not as fine as the eminent city rugs, these handmade rugs are still among the highest of quality in the world. Some of these small towns south of Tehran include Veramin, Tafresh, Boroujerd, Khomaine, and Taleghan. Some towns around Isfahan are Najafabad, Josheghan, and the village of Maymeh. There are also a few cities near Kashan that produce fine rugs, such as Ardekan. Kashan and Isfahan are both pioneers in the game of handmade rugs, and the two have had great influence on their surrounding cities. This is why Najafabad carries out the design of Isfahan, and Yazd and Ardekan weave the famous design of Kashan. Most of the time, the rugs woven in Kashan, Yazd, or Ardekan are indistinguishable from one another. A genuine Isfahan rug however can always be identified by an expert. Most of these towns of central Iran have existed for thousands of years and they have built up quite a rich history.

      Gabbeh Rugs
      Nomadic tribes in this area, which stretches from the great southern Fars province of Iran through parts of the province of Kerman, have a long history of rug weaving using strong Turkish and Kurdish weaving influences and techniques. The famous Gabbeh is produced in the southern part of this vast province and the Afshar and Qashqai regions are also situated here. The Afshar tribes are within the province of Kerman while the notorious Qashqai tribes are spread across the two provinces and some other parts of southern Iran. Some rug weaving centers include the ancient and historic city of Shiraz which is in Fars, the famous city of Kerman which is in the province of Kerman, and the towns of Abadeh, Sirjan, and many other villages and nomadic colonies spread along these regions. These rugs were not originally made to sell commercially. Rather, people who wove them were following an ancient custom that has been a part of the Iranian heritage for over 3500 years. Younger girls begin weaving early to demonstrate their preparedness for marriage and to offer their handiwork as part of their dowry and it is custom for most women to have this wonderful talent which is rug weaving.

      Goravan Rugs
      This ancient region of Iran is very renowned for rug weaving. It has a rich history that dates back a long time. Here, in these rugged and mountainous conditions, much like many other parts of Iran, almost all the men and women have the talent and skill to weave high quality carpets by hand, with no use of modern technology whatsoever. In some cases, rug weaving is the family's main source of income. They trade the rugs in nearby cities with local merchants for staples and necessities of the home. A few regions and towns that are included in this Turkish region of Iran are Ardabil, Bakhshaish, Gharadjeh (Gharabagh), Goravan, Heriz, Mehriban, Sarab, and Shahsavan. Their weaving style originates partly from Mongols who invaded Iran in the 13th century, and settled the northwest. This historic region of Iran and some parts of Turkey and Uzbekistan have really been significant in the forming of the present day carpet industry. Carpet weaving has long been a custom of theirs and they continue to weave them everyday.

      Hussainabad Rugs
      Hamedan is an ancient Persian city (the second oldest city of Iran), which lies at about 6500 feet above sea level in the rugged mountainous region of northwestern Iran. It has a rich history, which dates back many centuries. The city itself, along with the countless villages and districts surrounding it, produces a good portion of the tribal rugs of Iran. Some areas around Hamedan include Chenar, Derjazin, Hussainabad, Nahavand, and the Kurdish districts of Khamseh, and many others, that are between Arak and Hamedan. All the rugs produced in the surrounding area of Hamedan are marketed inside of the city. There can be seen obvious traces of Kurdish and some Turkish influence on the people of the province of Hamedan, which is just east of Kurdistan. The peaceful people of the province of Hamedan have managed for several centuries, despite all the greedy foreign invasions, to keep their precious talent of rug weaving alive.

      History of Kelardasht Rugs
      The northern part of Iran, including the provinces of Gilan, Zanjan, and Mazandaran is very rich in history. There are some strong traces of Turkish and Kurdish influence seen in these nomadic and/or semi-nomadic people, but they are mostly of Persian origin. Turkish and Mogul tribes who are descendants of the Mongolians (led by Chengis Khan) who invaded the country in the 13th century have been living in this region for many centuries. The province of Zanjan has a higher Kurdish population and Gilan has a higher Persian nomadic population. These peaceful people are documented to have been weaving rugs for over 3000 years. They have a migratory lifestyle and almost all the women, along with most of the men, have the incredible talent of rug weaving. In some cases, the rug weaving is the family's main source of income. These provinces of Iran continued to weave rugs even in the harshest conditions and they kept this truly magnificent art alive as much as they could.

      Koliai Rugs
      Kurdish carpets are woven throughout western Iran, in and around the rugged mountainous region of Kurdistan. The Kurds derive from the ancient nomadic peoples that roamed the area thousands of years ago. They live a semi-nomadic life, either in villages or in moving tribes away from the cities, where they can still carry out their old traditions and live as they did thousands of years ago. A few of the Kurdish tribes of the western regions include the Herki, Senjabi, Gurani, Jaffid, and Kalhors. A few major Kurdish rug-producing centers are Senneh, Bidjar, and the district of Khamseh. Some other Kurdish villages and districts that produce rugs are Borchelu, Goltogh, Khoi, Koliai, Lylyan, Mousel, Nanadj, Songhore, Touserkan, and Zagheh. As you can see, the Kurds are well established, and historic semi-nomadic and/or nomadic peoples of Iran who date back thousands of years. Many other major rug producing centers of Iran, such as Hamadan, Lorestan, or even Arak show obvious traces of Kurdish influence. Sometimes they incorporate the style and techniques of the Turkish people of Iran, who are also very widespread. The Kurds are a very peaceful and gentle group who prefer their simple nomadic lives to the complexities and frustrations of the modern technological world.

      Mahal Rugs
      A very important rug-producing district in Iran, Arak (formerly known as Sultanabad) and its surrounding area, is located in the Central Northwestern part of Iran, east of the province of Hamedan, south of the province of Zanjan, and north of the province of Lorestan in the province of Markad. Arak, along with its many neighboring villages, produces countless quantities of handmade Persian rugs every year. The finished carpets are usually marketed in the town itself. Some major areas around Arak are known as the Mahallat, Ferahan, and Lylyan. Some neighboring towns and villages are: Malayer, Meshkabad, Mirabad, Seraband, Sarough, Jozan, along with many other small Kurdish villages and settlements. There has been strong Kurdish influences on these people's style of weaving, and some traces of Turkish ancestry can also be seen. Arak is where The Manchester Firm of Ziegler's opened an office in 1883. Originally an importer of English goods, the firm soon realized the financial advantages of starting a carpet factory in this region to produce rugs to be marketed in Europe and the USA. It has been estimated that by the turn of the century, Ziegler controlled over 2500 looms at work in this district. The Mahallat produces a very high quality rug known as Mahal, and Sarough is also famous for producing exquisite pieces. Lylyans tend to look more tribal as do many rugs made in these surrounding villages. Ferahans are very recognized world over as a result of their high quality weave and rich history, and Serabands are very similar to Ferahans. Mirabad also produces a very high quality carpet, usually with an overall design, known as the Mir. All the rugs of this area are completely unique and one of a kind, but a striking resemblance can be seen within some of them. This entire area is very important and precious to the Persian rug community, and deserves the respect that it gets.

      Mazlaghan Rugs
      The northern part of Iran, including the provinces of Gilan, Zanjan, and Mazandaran is very rich in history. There are some strong traces of Turkish and Kurdish influence seen in these nomadic and/or semi-nomadic people, but they are mostly of Persian origin. Turkish and Mogul tribes who are descendants of the Mongolians (led by Chengis Khan) who invaded the country in the 13th century have been living in this region for many centuries. The province of Zanjan has a higher Kurdish population and Gilan has a higher Persian nomadic population. These peaceful people are documented to have been weaving rugs for over 3000 years. They have a migratory lifestyle and almost all the women, along with most of the men, have the incredible talent of rug weaving. In some cases, the rug weaving is the family's main source of income. These provinces of Iran continued to weave rugs even in the harshest conditions and they kept this truly magnificent art alive as much as they could.

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